Tags: practice

Me typing?
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WritingExcuses 6.22: Continuing Education for Writers

WritingExcuses 6.22: Continuing Education for Writers

From http://www.writingexcuses.com/2011/10/30/writing-excuses-6-22-continuing-education-for-writers/

Key points: you need lots of practice to become a writer, but some pointers about the right things to practice can make it much more effective. Workshops, podcasts, online resources, books -- they can all help. Don't miss the Turkey City Lexicon! Learning new tools and using them consciously can be difficult -- it doesn't mean you should quit. Try focusing on three tools that you want to master, starting with the hardest.
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We are out of time. Mur, I'm going to go ahead and lean on you for a writing prompt.
[Mur] Of course you are.
[Mary] That's just mean.
[Mur] It is mean.
[Dan] It's cruel.
[Mur] Well, the writing prompt would be... Someone who wants to go to a writing workshop, but they get held up, unfortunately, by chicken and waffles. Whether that's really chicken and waffles, or metaphorical chicken and waffles, or what Dan thinks is a metaphor for chicken and waffles, that's up to you.
[Howard] Perfect. This has been Writing Excuses. Recorded in front of an empty hotel lobby in DragonCon. You're out of excuses. Now go write.
BrainUnderRepair
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Writing Excuses 6.19: Pitching

Writing Excuses 6.19: Pitching

From http://www.writingexcuses.com/2011/10/09/writing-excuses-6-19-pitching/

Key points: three pitches, one line, three paragraph, deep conversation. Adding more words to a pitch that's failing will sink it faster -- stop. What's it about? Not a plot synopsis -- what kind of book is it, who would like it. Make them say, "Tell me more." Three paragraph -- one concept, something interesting, something cool. Make them say, "I want to read this book." Deep conversation -- let the other person talk about what they find exciting, what they find interesting. Practice your pitches with friends and family.
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[Brandon] All right. Howard, you've got a...
[Howard] I've got a writing prompt. Take three of your favorite books. Go ahead and look at the back cover copy if you want to. Take three of your favorite books. Write one of each pitch for each of those books, so you're writing nine things. You're learning to pitch somebody else's stuff. Then, and here's the hard part, you need to make one of your friends read one of those books by using those pitches.
[Brandon] All right. This has been Writing Excuses. You're out of excuses, now go pitch.
[Howard] To actual other people.
Fireworks Delight
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Writing Excuses Season Two Episode 33: How Not to Be Overwhelmed

Writing Excuses Season Two Episode 33: How Not to Be Overwhelmed

From http://www.writingexcuses.com/2009/05/25/writing-excuses-season-2-episode-33-how-to-not-be-overwhelmed/

Key points: beware of being overwhelmed by stuff -- too much podcasting, too much writing book advice, too much too much. Learning writing is like learning to play an instrument -- you aren't an expert at the beginning, and when you're practicing, you focus on specific aspects. Don't let the permanency of writing fool you -- you can always change it! Write something, and learn from your mistakes. Pick your favorite scene and write that. Get into the habit of writing. Kill the great golden idea -- you will have lots of ideas. Give yourself a deadline and develop the plot, or just start writing -- but get away from the worldbuilding and do something. Until you try writing, you don't know whether you like it or not.
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[Brandon] Writing prompt. I'm going to go ahead and do it this week. Write a story about my friend Nameless.
[Howard] Oh dear. And his name isn't John.
[Brandon] No, his name isn't John. Nameless, I will see you for lunch on Thursday. This is been Writing Excuses.
BrainUnderRepair
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Writing Excuses Episode 35: Voice, Tone, and Style

Writing Excuses Episode 35: Voice, Tone, and Style

From http://www.writingexcuses.com/2008/10/06/writing-excuses-episode-35-voice-tone-and-style/

Key points: how do you write so that it is distinctive to you? This is NOT something that a starting writer should worry about too much -- they need to focus on characters, plot, and setting. One stylistic thing for starting writers is to pay attention to using said and asked instead of said-bookisms. Another point (lost in the transcription) was to watch for overuse of very, adjectives, and favorite words. And the main suggestion for developing a style - practice, practice, practice. Find what you're good at and emphasize that, avoid what you're not good at.
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[Brandon] Writing prompt: take a scene -- just a quick scene -- then write it as Dan would write it, then write it as Brandon would write it, and then write it as Howard would write it.
[Dan] should we give them a scene? Maybe the "Luke, I'm your father" scene from Star Wars?
[Howard] no, make it the romantic confession scene from Star Wars Episode Two