Tags: conventions

ISeeYou2
  • mbarker

Writing Excuses 11.50: Hand-Selling Your Book to Potential Readers, with Michael R. Underwood

Writing Excuses 11.50: Hand-Selling Your Book to Potential Readers, with Michael R. Underwood

From http://www.writingexcuses.com/2016/12/11/11-50-hand-selling-your-book-to-potential-readers-with-michael-r-underwood/

Key Points: Hard selling can poison the well. Don't do it. Start with a conversation. Questions are good. Get them to talk about their favorite books, then pitch something similar. Find out what problem they have, what they are interested in. Set up your table in clusters. A big backlist or working with other authors can help you meet their interest with something that matches. But find out what their problem is, and then suit your pitch to that. "What do you like to read?" and "What kind of fun are you looking to have with a book?" Be enthusiastic! If you have a big backlist/series, prime yourself to talk about a good entry point to get past paralysis of choice. Try out different pitches, and then think about what worked and didn't work. Get the book in their hands. Your pitch is a story you are telling to an audience of one, make it a good one! Don't forget the economic pitch -- sales bundles, special deals, etc. Build relationships, don't force today's sale and lose a long-term reader.

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[Brandon] All right. I'm going to call it right here. But Michael, you said you have a writing prompt for us.
[Michael] I really love looking at the sociology of science fiction. I think this is may be related to a prompt that Mary has given, so I'll apologize if it's a little bit of a retread. When you have an idea about like oh, say, here's a cool technology. So, come up with a cool technology. Then, to figure out who your protagonist is, look at who has the most to gain and the most to lose, and how it will change any given industry. Then you can find a protagonist there. From that, you've created a couple of points, and go forward. Write an outline or write a story.
[Brandon] Excellent. Well, Michael, thank you so much for being on the podcast.
[Michael] Thanks so much for having me. That'll be $20.
[Laughter]
[Brandon] And the audience from our Writing Excuses cruise. Thank you guys.
[Whoo! Applause]
[Brandon] This has been Writing Excuses. You're out of excuses. Now go write.
BrainUnderRepair
  • mbarker

Writing Excuses 11.2: How to Get the Most Out Of a Conference, with Kathy Chung

Writing Excuses 11.2: How to Get the Most Out Of a Conference, with Kathy Chung

From http://www.writingexcuses.com/2016/01/10/11-2-how-to-get-the-most-out-of-a-conference-with-kathy-chung/

Key Points: Conventions, or cons, tend to be fan-based, volunteer run, and the goal is to celebrate readers and have fun. Conferences are more about honing your craft, growing as a writer. To get ready for a conference, first introverts may want to spend some time alone to recharge before you come. Go with an open mind and try things. Bring your notebook! Think about your learning style beforehand, and what helps you capture information. Plan on networking, at meals, everywhere! Strike up conversations. Be aware of BarCon. Business cards are optional, carry a manuscript for your own use if you don't mind hauling it home again, consider cough drops, sweater, earplugs, eye mask, or other personal comfort items.

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[Brandon] Well, Kathy, this has been wonderful. Thank you for coming on the podcast with us.
[Kathy] Thank you for having me.
[Brandon] We are going to have you give us a little bit of homework, or at least our audience a little bit of homework.
[Kathy] I think that people should have a look, research some cons in their area, in their genre, and beyond.
[Brandon] Right. Do some research. Find out what cons are near you, what convent... Conferences are near you, and ones that are far away but are specifically to your genre and things like that. That's great. Thank you so much. You guys who are listening... This has been Writing Excuses. You're out of excuses, now go write.
ISeeYou2
  • mbarker

Writing Excuses Season Three Episode 10: Do's and Don'ts of Attending Cons

Writing Excuses Season Three Episode 10: Do's and Don'ts of Attending Cons

From http://www.writingexcuses.com/2009/08/02/writing-excuses-season-3-episode-10-the-dos-and-donts-of-attending-cons/

Key points: Don't be a booth barnacle. Beware of the fan moment! As an aspiring professional, present yourself as a professional. Know who you want to meet, and why, and respect their schedule. Have leading questions that are easy for them to answer, such as "Do you have a few minutes some time to talk?" "What panels are you on that you would recommend for an aspiring writer?" or "What are you working on now?" Don't ask "What are you looking for?" Don't be belligerent. Have a plan, and listen. Go to the publisher panels and listen. Don't carry a manuscript. Do carry a business card. Do plan to take notes. Do look for blogs. Do go to panels on writing. And mostly, quite sincerely, have fun.
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[Brandon] I think we've gone long enough. Let's go ahead and finish our writing prompt. Dan? What does the person have in their pocket?
[Dan] What does he have in his pocket?
[Brandon] It's not the one ring, that's not allowed. And it's not allowed to be nothing, either.
[Dan] It's not the one ring? He has an entire universe in his pocket.
[Brandon] Um. And it's not peace-bonded.
[Laughter]
ISeeYou2
  • mbarker

Writing Excuses Season Three Episode Nine: Attending Cons

Writing Excuses Season Three Episode Nine: Attending Cons

From http://www.writingexcuses.com/2009/07/26/writing-excuses-season-3-episode-9-attending-conventions-part-i/

Key points: First of Two Parts! Conferences are for training, conventions are for fanning. Tradeshows/Expos are for industry, and media cons are exhibitions. For an aspiring writer, conventions provide inexpensive introductions and networking, while conferences provide intensive training at a cost. Details of what to do to make cons useful to you...next week.
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[Dan] Wait, we need a writing prompt, don't we?
[Brandon] I don't know, it's a two-part episode.
[Jordan] Give them half of the writing prompt now.
[Brandon] Oh, half the writing prompt. OK, half your writing prompt...
[Howard] The protagonist has shown up at a convention and in his pocket he has a ...
[Dan] See you next week.
Fireworks Delight
  • mbarker

Writing Excuses Season Two Episode 19: Do creative writing classes help?

Writing Excuses Season Two Episode 19: Do creative writing classes help?

From http://www.writingexcuses.com/2009/02/16/writing-excuses-season-2-episode-19-do-creative-writing-classes-help/

Key points: creative writing classes, panels at conventions, books on creative writing -- they can all be useful, but you have to want to learn. Learn about the business, learn to be accountable for your own productivity. Ask yourself -- without the magic, without the robots, without the fantastic elements, is there still a story here? The range of human ability that we are born with is miniscule compared to the range of human accomplishments, what you can do. Listen to suggestions, and don't be afraid to rework your writing from the ground up. You can learn, but you gotta really try.
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[Brandon] This has been Writing Excuses. Your writing prompt is...
[Dan] Write a story about a golfing metaphor.
[Brandon] Thanks for listening.