July 22nd, 2014

ISeeYou2

Writing Excuses 9.30: Critiquing A Fire in the Heavens

Writing Excuses 9.30: Critiquing A Fire in the Heavens

From http://www.writingexcuses.com/2014/07/20/writing-excuses-9-30-critiquing-a-fire-in-the-heavens/

Key points: Milford Method starts with comments by each critiquer for a fixed amount of time (2 minutes for this episode). Each person lists takeaways that the author should think about -- problems, confusing points, unbelievable, don't care, and cool stuff. Then the author asks questions. Be careful about cramming too much into one story. Readers want to know "What is this story about?" Be aware of what readers "add" to the story from their own ideas. Meta -- having a group look at a story twice, in brainstorming and in critique, may mean that they are carrying over impressions from the earlier session and not commenting on the writing on the page as much as their idea of what the story would be.
Focus on identifying issues, not necessarily fixing them. What's at stake, and what kind of character is this, can sometimes help resolve an issue.
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[Brandon] All right. I'm going to give you your writing prompt. Your writing prompt is write a story where a brainstorm comes alive. I don't know what that means. You'll have to decide it. A brainstorming session happens in the story and it comes to life. This has been Writing Excuses. You're out of excuses, now go write.
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